Super Photos

I love you guys, mmmwahhh

These remarkable photos and background

music will leave a lasting impression.

Pour a cup of coffee,

 

  • Let us sit awhile and together we enjoy the moment to view the art of photography.

toothsome-drink-coffee

 

Click here to begin :Super-Photos

 

Hundred Islands Philippines, I took this photo with my iPhone 4, January 7, 2011

 

I love you guys! mmmwahhh

 

Enjoy and have a super gusto weekend to all!

kiss smiley for orkut, myspace, facebook

 

Derinkuyu, Turkey- The Allure Of The Underground City…

For today’s Cafe Siesta, I’d like us to revisit this amazing City so that
those who are just following me now will also have the chance to see it.

Imagine a well-planned, well-connected, multi-tiered city in Turkey named

Derinkuyu, carved out of the stone underground. The history is incredible

and the fact that it has lasted this long in good condition is more amazing.

This may give food for thought about some cities of the future…

Hopefully, it won’t ever come to that…

click here:UndergroundcityofDERINKUYU

I think we need a red wine for today’s slides…  How about a toast!

A little note of advice:

Wine drinking is not good for the line they claim. Still, one by drinking red winepomace. Usually the culprits ‘fatty food’ with wine. But keep it always in one to two glasses of red wine per day. Wine drinkers are usually not overweight people. …

Unlike beer, even at relatively high consumption of wine a ‘wine belly’ is very unlikely.

Red instead of white wine

White and red wine contain many calories, but the little grain of red grapes contains more antioxidants. Furthermore, alcohol (in moderation!) help prevent blood clots.

Cheers Everyone!

Hmmm…  Did I just say wine drinking in here? Well I really need a drink :)
But too bad there ain’t nothing in here… :(

So better I will just grab me a cup of coffee… hahaha

 :)

toothsome-drink-coffee

Have A Great Weekend Everyone!

9

I love you guys…  mmmmwahhh!

La Rochelle

Originally posted on I Shoot I Zoom Some Sassy Shots:

Welcome to La Rochelle, West France

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IMG_1471IMG_1470IMG_1474IMG_1478IMG_1481IMG_1487

La Rochelle (French pronunciation: ​[la ʁɔ.ʃɛl]) is a city in western France and a seaport on the Bay of Biscay, a part of the Atlantic Ocean. It is the capital of the Charente-Maritime department.

The city is connected to the Île de Ré by a 2.9 km (1.8 mi) bridge completed on 19 May 1988. Its harbour opens into a protected strait, the Pertuis d’Antioche.

You can read more about La Rochelle here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_Rochelle

And here are more shots I took during my last visit August 2012.  Enjoy!

A very beautiful Merry-Go-Round

A very beautiful Merry-Go-Round

IMG_1495Vendors of wine in the Square
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The Famous French Merinque

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a dog show along the street

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Anchor on display

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IMG_1485IMG_1482IMG_1480

IMG_1484

Big Tyty and Vincou

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IMG_1467IMG_1465IMG_1464

IMG_1497An artist along the street :)IMG_1496

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View original 76 more words

A Fire Waterfall @ Yosemite National Park–BEAUTIFUL!

A rare sight!! 

Yosemite National Park, California , USA 
This park was published as a national park in 1890.  It is world famous for its rugged terrain, waterfalls and century-old pine trees (Sequoia).  It covers 1200 sq km and the “fire” waterfall of El Capitan is one of the most spectacular of all the scenery.

The spectacular view of the waterfall is created by the reflection of sunlight hitting the falling water at a specific angle. This rare sight can only be seen at  a 2-week period towards the end of February.  To photograph this rare event, photographers would often have to wait and endure years of patience in order to capture them.  The reason is because it’s appearance depends on a few natural phenomenon’s occurring at the same time, and just plain luck.

1st, is the formation of the waterfall.  The water is formed by the melting of snow and ice at the top of the mountain.  It melts between the month of December and January and by the end of February there might not be much snow left to melt.

2nd, is the specific angle of the sun’s rays hitting the falling water.  The sun’s position must be exactly at a particular spot in the sky.  This occurs only in the month of February and at the short hours of dusk. If it is a day full of clouds or something blocking the sun, you can only take pictures of a darkened waterfall.  It coincides with the fact that the weather in the National Park at that time of the year is often volatile and unpredictable.  It compounds to the difficulty of getting these pictures.  Usually permission has to be allowed to enter the park that time of year, as dangerous road conditions could be hazardous to travel.

Someone did and we all get to see it.

WOW!  I can only imagine seeing it in real life ! 

:)

 

***

#19 All Time Favorite Post- Some Strange Structures That I Enjoyed Looking At…

Revisited:

The Crooked House, Sopot Poland

 Kansas City Public Library ( Missouri, United States )

Low Impact Woodland House, Wales, UK

This is my favorite :)

Stone House (Guimarães, Portugal)

Snail House (Sofia, Bulgaria)

Guggenheim Museum (Bilbao, Spain)

Sagrada Familia (Barcelona, Spain)

Museum of Contemporary Art (Niteroi, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil)

Habitat 67 (Montreal, Canada)

The Basket Building ( Ohio, United States )

…and this one always make me smile :)

#31 All Time Favorite Post- When The Earth Starts Moving…

THE EARTH

Earth is the third planet from the Sun and the fifth largest:

 orbit: 149,600,000 km (1.00 AU) from Sun diameter: 12,756.3 km mass: 5.972e24 kg
The Earth as seen from space

Earth is the only planet whose English name does not derive from Greek/Roman mythology. The name derives from Old English and Germanic. There are, of course, hundreds of other names for the planet in other languages. In Roman Mythology, the goddess of the Earth was Tellus – the fertile soil (Greek: Gaia, terra mater - Mother Earth).

It was not until the time of Copernicus (the sixteenth century) that it was understood that the Earth is just another planet.
Earth, of course, can be studied without the aid of spacecraft. Nevertheless it was not until the twentieth century that we had maps of the entire planet. Pictures of the planet taken from space are of considerable importance; for example, they are an enormous help in weather prediction and especially in tracking and predicting hurricanes. And they are extraordinarily beautiful.
The Earth is divided into several layers which have distinct chemical and seismic properties (depths in km):
-0- 40 Crust 40- 400 Upper mantle 400- 650 Transition region 650-2700 Lower mantle 2700-2890 D'' layer 2890-5150 Outer core 5150-6378 Inner core 

 


The crust varies considerably in thickness, it is thinner under the oceans, thicker under the continents. The inner core and crust are solid; the outer core and mantle layers are plastic or semi-fluid. The various layers are separated by discontinuities which are evident in seismic data; the best known of these is the Mohorovicic discontinuity between the crust and upper mantle.


Earth as seen from the Moon

Most of the mass of the Earth is in the mantle, most of the rest in the core; the part we inhabit is a tiny fraction of the whole (values below x10^24 kilograms):

 

 atmosphere = 0.0000051 oceans = 0.0014 crust = 0.026 mantle = 4.043 outer core = 1.835 inner core = 0.09675 

The core is probably composed mostly of iron (or nickel/iron) though it is possible that some lighter elements may be present, too. Temperatures at the center of the core may be as high as 7500 K, hotter than the surface of the Sun. The lower mantle is probably mostly silicon, magnesium and oxygen with some iron, calcium and aluminum. The upper mantle is mostly olivene and pyroxene (iron/magnesium silicates), calcium and aluminum. We know most of this only from seismic techniques; samples from the upper mantle arrive at the surface as lava from volcanoes but the majority of the Earth is inaccessible. The crust is primarily quartz (silicon dioxide) and other silicates like feldspar. Taken as a whole, the Earth’s chemical composition (by mass) is:

 34.6% Iron 29.5% Oxygen 15.2% Silicon 12.7% Magnesium 2.4% Nickel 1.9% Sulfur 0.05% Titanium

 

The Earth is the densest major body in the solar system.

 

The other terrestrial planets probably have similar structures and compositions with some differences: the Moon has at most a small core; Mercury has an extra large core (relative to its diameter); the mantles of Mars and the Moon are much thicker; the Moon and Mercury may not have chemically distinct crusts; Earth may be the only one with distinct inner and outer cores. Note, however, that our knowledge of planetary interiors is mostly theoretical even for the Earth.


Earth as a map of the world

Unlike the other terrestrial planets, Earth’s crust is divided into several separate solid plates which float around independently on top of the hot mantle below. The theory that describes this is known as plate tectonics. It is characterized by two major processes: spreading and subduction. Spreading occurs when two plates move away from each other and new crust is created by upwelling magma from below. Subduction occurs when two plates collide and the edge of one dives beneath the other and ends up being destroyed in the mantle. There is also transverse motion at some plate boundaries (i.e. the San Andreas Fault in California) and collisions between continental plates (i.e. India/Eurasia). There are (at present) eight major plates:

  • North American Plate – North America, western North Atlantic and Greenland 
  • South American Plate - South America and western South Atlantic
  • Antarctic Plate – Antarctica and the “Southern Ocean”
  • Eurasian Plate – eastern North Atlantic, Europe and Asia except for India
  • African Plate – Africa, eastern South Atlantic and western Indian Ocean
  • Indian-Australian Plate – India, Australia, New Zealand and most of Indian Ocean
  • Nazca Plate – eastern Pacific Ocean adjacent to South America
  • Pacific Plate – most of the Pacific Ocean (and the southern coast of California!)

There are also twenty or more small plates such as the Arabian, Cocos, and Philippine Plates. Earthquakes are much more common at the plate boundaries. Plotting their locations makes it easy to see the plate boundaries (right).

The Earth’s surface is very young. In the relatively short (by astronomical standards) period of 500,000,000 years or so erosion and tectonic processes destroy and recreate most of the Earth’s surface and thereby eliminate almost all traces of earlier geologic surface history (such as impact craters). Thus the very early history of the Earth has mostly been erased. The Earth is 4.5 to 4.6 billion years old, but the oldest known rocks are about 4 billion years old and rocks older than 3 billion years are rare. The oldest fossils of living organisms are less than 3.9 billion years old. There is no record of the critical period when life was first getting started.

 71 Percent of the Earth’s surface is covered with water. Earth is the only planet on which water can exist in liquid form on the surface (though there may be liquid ethane or methane on Titan’s surface and liquid water beneath the surface of Europa). Liquid water is, of course, essential for life as we know it. The heat capacity of the oceans is also very important in keeping the Earth’s temperature relatively stable. Liquid water is also responsible for most of the erosion and weathering of the Earth’s continents, a process unique in the solar system today (though it may have occurred on Mars in the past).

And when the earth starts moving, it is time to get out of the way…

Click any of the images to see the video… Brace yourself!

Immortal Greig and Renoir

Cheers!

Sit back and enjoy some of the masterworks of immortal painters

Greig and Renoir with soothing background music.

plus

Pour  yourself a cup of coffee and drink with me…

Click this :

http://www.mightybook.com/art_and_music/renoir/renoir_loop.html

Have A Pleasant Weekend To All!

Protected: Charle de Gaulle

img_0059

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

#1Spy: I Spy With My Little Eye- Something Beginning With R

Au Printempt

Au Printempt, Paris France, July 2010

If your answer is correct you can click Au Printempt to see what’s in the store :)

This one is called #ISpy and is the brainchild of Mum of One. Just have a look at the pic above and then use the comments section to say what you see.

You can also click on the box below to look at this week’s other entries.

Mum of One

My Favorite Philosophy

This is a re-post… I hope you’d enjoy it as much as my other blogger-friends did :)

These are timeless words of wisdom that can usher you through life’s

ups and downs. Turn on the sound for your added enjoyment with beautiful scenery to appreciate.

Click  to view: My_Favorite_Philosophy

Enjoy!

Al-Murjan Private Resort, Jeddah, February 2, 2012

…and have an awesome weekend to everybody!

When The Earth Starts Moving…

THE EARTH

Earth is the third planet from the Sun and the fifth largest:

 orbit: 149,600,000 km (1.00 AU) from Sun diameter: 12,756.3 km mass: 5.972e24 kg
The Earth as seen from space

Earth is the only planet whose English name does not derive from Greek/Roman mythology. The name derives from Old English and Germanic. There are, of course, hundreds of other names for the planet in other languages. In Roman Mythology, the goddess of the Earth was Tellus – the fertile soil (Greek: Gaia, terra mater - Mother Earth).

It was not until the time of Copernicus (the sixteenth century) that it was understood that the Earth is just another planet.
Earth, of course, can be studied without the aid of spacecraft. Nevertheless it was not until the twentieth century that we had maps of the entire planet. Pictures of the planet taken from space are of considerable importance; for example, they are an enormous help in weather prediction and especially in tracking and predicting hurricanes. And they are extraordinarily beautiful.
The Earth is divided into several layers which have distinct chemical and seismic properties (depths in km):
-0- 40 Crust 40- 400 Upper mantle 400- 650 Transition region 650-2700 Lower mantle 2700-2890 D'' layer 2890-5150 Outer core 5150-6378 Inner core 

 


The crust varies considerably in thickness, it is thinner under the oceans, thicker under the continents. The inner core and crust are solid; the outer core and mantle layers are plastic or semi-fluid. The various layers are separated by discontinuities which are evident in seismic data; the best known of these is the Mohorovicic discontinuity between the crust and upper mantle.


Earth as seen from the Moon

Most of the mass of the Earth is in the mantle, most of the rest in the core; the part we inhabit is a tiny fraction of the whole (values below x10^24 kilograms):

 

 atmosphere = 0.0000051 oceans = 0.0014 crust = 0.026 mantle = 4.043 outer core = 1.835 inner core = 0.09675 

The core is probably composed mostly of iron (or nickel/iron) though it is possible that some lighter elements may be present, too. Temperatures at the center of the core may be as high as 7500 K, hotter than the surface of the Sun. The lower mantle is probably mostly silicon, magnesium and oxygen with some iron, calcium and aluminum. The upper mantle is mostly olivene and pyroxene (iron/magnesium silicates), calcium and aluminum. We know most of this only from seismic techniques; samples from the upper mantle arrive at the surface as lava from volcanoes but the majority of the Earth is inaccessible. The crust is primarily quartz (silicon dioxide) and other silicates like feldspar. Taken as a whole, the Earth’s chemical composition (by mass) is:

 34.6% Iron 29.5% Oxygen 15.2% Silicon 12.7% Magnesium 2.4% Nickel 1.9% Sulfur 0.05% Titanium

 

The Earth is the densest major body in the solar system.

 

The other terrestrial planets probably have similar structures and compositions with some differences: the Moon has at most a small core; Mercury has an extra large core (relative to its diameter); the mantles of Mars and the Moon are much thicker; the Moon and Mercury may not have chemically distinct crusts; Earth may be the only one with distinct inner and outer cores. Note, however, that our knowledge of planetary interiors is mostly theoretical even for the Earth.


Earth as a map of the world

Unlike the other terrestrial planets, Earth’s crust is divided into several separate solid plates which float around independently on top of the hot mantle below. The theory that describes this is known as plate tectonics. It is characterized by two major processes: spreading and subduction. Spreading occurs when two plates move away from each other and new crust is created by upwelling magma from below. Subduction occurs when two plates collide and the edge of one dives beneath the other and ends up being destroyed in the mantle. There is also transverse motion at some plate boundaries (i.e. the San Andreas Fault in California) and collisions between continental plates (i.e. India/Eurasia). There are (at present) eight major plates:

  • North American Plate – North America, western North Atlantic and Greenland 
  • South American Plate - South America and western South Atlantic
  • Antarctic Plate – Antarctica and the “Southern Ocean”
  • Eurasian Plate – eastern North Atlantic, Europe and Asia except for India
  • African Plate – Africa, eastern South Atlantic and western Indian Ocean
  • Indian-Australian Plate – India, Australia, New Zealand and most of Indian Ocean
  • Nazca Plate – eastern Pacific Ocean adjacent to South America
  • Pacific Plate – most of the Pacific Ocean (and the southern coast of California!)

There are also twenty or more small plates such as the Arabian, Cocos, and Philippine Plates. Earthquakes are much more common at the plate boundaries. Plotting their locations makes it easy to see the plate boundaries (right).

The Earth’s surface is very young. In the relatively short (by astronomical standards) period of 500,000,000 years or so erosion and tectonic processes destroy and recreate most of the Earth’s surface and thereby eliminate almost all traces of earlier geologic surface history (such as impact craters). Thus the very early history of the Earth has mostly been erased. The Earth is 4.5 to 4.6 billion years old, but the oldest known rocks are about 4 billion years old and rocks older than 3 billion years are rare. The oldest fossils of living organisms are less than 3.9 billion years old. There is no record of the critical period when life was first getting started.

 71 Percent of the Earth’s surface is covered with water. Earth is the only planet on which water can exist in liquid form on the surface (though there may be liquid ethane or methane on Titan’s surface and liquid water beneath the surface of Europa). Liquid water is, of course, essential for life as we know it. The heat capacity of the oceans is also very important in keeping the Earth’s temperature relatively stable. Liquid water is also responsible for most of the erosion and weathering of the Earth’s continents, a process unique in the solar system today (though it may have occurred on Mars in the past).

And when the earth starts moving, it is time to get out of the way…

Click any of the images to see the video… Brace yourself!

Pictures that speak for themselves…

صوره, صوره وتعليق, وتعليق

صوره, صوره وتعليق, وتعليق

صوره, صوره وتعليق, وتعليق

صوره, صوره وتعليق,<br /><br /><br />
 وتعليق” border=”0″ /></a></p>
<p><a href=صوره, صوره وتعليق, وتعليق

صوره, صوره وتعليق, وتعليق

صوره, صوره وتعليق, وتعليق

صوره, صوره وتعليق, وتعليق

صوره, صوره وتعليق, وتعليق

صوره, صوره وتعليق, وتعليق

صوره, صوره وتعليق, وتعليق

Derinkuyu, Turkey- The Allure Of The Underground City…

Derinkuyu

Imagine a well-planned, well-connected, multi-tiered city in Turkey named

Derinkuyu, carved out of the stone underground. The history is incredible

and the fact that it has lasted this long in good condition is more amazing.

This may give food for thought about some cities of the future…

Hopefully, it won’t ever come to that…

click here:UndergroundcityofDERINKUYU

I think we need a red wine for today’s slides…  How about a toast!

A little note of advice:

Wine drinking is not good for the line they claim. Still, one by drinking red winepomace. Usually the culprits ‘fatty food’ with wine. But keep it always in one to two glasses of red wine per day. Wine drinkers are usually not overweight people. …

Unlike beer, even at relatively high consumption of wine a ‘wine belly’ is very unlikely.

Red instead of white wine

White and red wine contain many calories, but the little grain of red grapes contains more antioxidants. Furthermore, alcohol (in moderation!) help prevent blood clots.

Cheers Everyone!

The Beautiful Canada

Canada

There are many aspects to life in Canada…

Beauty is the common denominator.

Come and travel with me to Canada, while we listen to this tune: God Rest Ye Merry Men, sang by:Loreena Mckennitt

Pour  yourself a cup of coffee, drink with me,

or belly dance with me  with its lovely tune

belly dancer animation, belly dance animation, belly dance fun stuff, belly dance clipart

while we enjoy our journey.

Click this :

Canada_Sigal

and let’s start with our trip.

Have A Pleasant Weekend To All!

Art Game-W-10 An Elephant At Springtime

Balancing

Art Game

Raffleberry

Balance is the key in life…

 

======================================================================================================

Art game continues…. to Tuesday 12pm (GMT) and then a new image will be post on Wednesday and so on.

This is fun… Come and join us!

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