Sunday’s Sashay

anigif

Family Christmas Tree

This was our hand-made Christmas Tree 🙂 last 2013…

 

christmas tree

xmas tree

I won’t be able to be with my family this Christmas’16,
but the memories and togetherness of making our Family Christmas Tree with them count the most.

The joy of making it and sharing thoughts on how to do it was already a Blissful Family Christmas.

***

2014
christmas-2014

***

2015

img_1965

 

Enjoy Your Sunday!

6

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La Playa Outside Barcelona City And Paella

 If you happen to visit Barcelona take the train at Plaça Catalunya towards Mataró (it only takes 20 minutes), jump off the train at Montgat Nord and go to one of Barcelona’s best beaches, Montgat’s beach. It’s not that crowded, so if you just want to relax and doze off, you can!

Barcelona Beach Barcelona Beach2 Barcelona Beach3 Barcelona Beach4
Barcelona15
I had the pleasure to experience the ambiance of one of their awesome powder rooms…  Neat and clean isn’t it?
Barcelona17

I was lucky too to catch some beach boys having fun and showing-off their sport.

Barcelona Boys2 Barcelona Boys3 Barcelona Boys4I also enjoyed the taste of their famous Paella quite like our recipe in the Philippines.
Barcelona16
And yes! The cervesza/ beer with lemon…   Truly amazing!
IMG_0376

***Taken in Barcelona, Spain,July 31, 2014

Sunday’s Sashay

anigif

Family Christmas Tree

This is our hand-made Christmas Tree 🙂 My children and I made this one as early as 1 in the morning and we finished it at 5 in the morning, December 1, 2013… 10 hours before my flight coming back to the Kingdom 🙂

christmas tree

xmas tree

I won’t be able to be with my kids this Christmas but the memories and togetherness of making our Family Christmas Tree with them count the most.

The joy of making it and sharing thoughts on how to do it was already a Blissful Family Christmas.

 

Enjoy Your Sunday!

6

Sunday’s Sashay

anigif

A New Chapter Begins…

I feel great to tell everyone that I am now single.

Three years after my separation (2005), I have filed a marriage annulment (2008).

At long last this year 2013, last September 30, the court has decided and ordered that my marriage was null and void.

I am so happy as ever.

Happy because a new chapter begins in my life and I can move on forward.

Some of you may wonder and would ask me, “do you have any regrets at all?  Do you feel sad?

Well, honestly I do not have any regrets at all.  I have four beautiful, loving and responsible kids.  They are now all grown-ups and as a mother I am so fulfilled that I manage to put them all to school.  A year from now my first daughter, Maria Ahtalia will soon finish her Dentistry course and become a successful Dental Surgeon or Orthodontist.  My second daughter, Greta Garda will soon graduate in IT course 5 months from now to become a successful Digital Arts Designer. My third daughter, Tajah Jireh will soon to become a famous Fashion Designer, 3 years from now.  And my son, Picardo Leo, who is now in Secondary Schoool wanted to become the most wanted Architect one day.

I sounded so positive!  But that is most of mothers wished  for their children, aren’t we all?

Sad? Yes, there is a little sadness in a way that my marriage for 12 years did not work to  last.  But ending it, is the best thing to do and very smart move and I never and I won’t ever regret it.  I have the rest of my life now to look forward to and so I must make the most of it and feel thankful to my God in every moment as possible and ask His guidance and wisdom on how I take charge of my life and make a difference.

I believe that everytihnig happens for a reason.  I have a full life and I take these life challenges in a positive outlook. I move on with my life. I keep adjusting to needs and keeping all vital areas of my life in balance. I will continue to passionately pursue my mission or goal and I will never ever quit.

Life goes on and a new chapter begins. 🙂

 

Last week November 30… My kids and I went to go house hunting.  And we wished to get and own a Victorian kind of house in this beautiful Village and Resort Community to live by one day 🙂

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

This is what a Victorian House look like.

Victorian house

  The house model isn’t ready for viewing yet so I just took this shot from one of their miniature displays…

Have a blessed Sunday Everyone! mmwahhh

TM5

Back to work! 🙂

Welcome To Outland Adventure’s Xcelerator Zipline

Do you know the other 4 players in our Art Game?

ThoughtsOfMyBrain
Chlly
SpoiledBrat
ActeurComique

Well they spent their holiday in Davao to Outland Adventure 🙂
And here are some photos of them to share.

To those who love adventure this is a good place to visit when you are in the Philippines.
Click Outland Adventure which is located in Davao City and check it out 🙂

ThoughtsOfMyBrain

Chlly

SpoiledBrat

ActeurComique

WOW! Amazing how they were all looking so natural… 🙂

We know how tricky they are when it comes to adding their images in our Art Game.

And look even here we can see how they were all creative with their photo poses and shots 🙂
Which I am sure they did something tricky in here… hahaha

Yep! These kids really enjoyed their holiday adventure in Davao City, Philippines  🙂

Come and visit one day 🙂

It’s only one and half hour travel from Manila to Davao…

Related Article:

Outland Adventure’s Xcelerator Zipline

Sunset

I Shoot I Zoom Some Sassy Shots

She stands in sunset
Purified by day’s last light
Beauty of silhouette
by
AshiAkira

View original post

Hundred Islands, Philippines

I Shoot I Zoom Some Sassy Shots

Welcome to Hundred Islands, Alaminus  Pangasinan Philippines

View original post

A Restaurant Where You Can Only BE Admitted Bare-footed…

VILLA ESCUDERO RESTAURANT IN THE PHILIPPINES

Would you like to dine in this restaurant?
I would like to experience it, I will check it out on my next holiday… 🙂

Come on let’s check

 their website !

Reposted

#31 All Time Favorite Post- When The Earth Starts Moving…

THE EARTH

Earth is the third planet from the Sun and the fifth largest:

 orbit: 149,600,000 km (1.00 AU) from Sun diameter: 12,756.3 km mass: 5.972e24 kg
The Earth as seen from space

Earth is the only planet whose English name does not derive from Greek/Roman mythology. The name derives from Old English and Germanic. There are, of course, hundreds of other names for the planet in other languages. In Roman Mythology, the goddess of the Earth was Tellus – the fertile soil (Greek: Gaia, terra mater – Mother Earth).

It was not until the time of Copernicus (the sixteenth century) that it was understood that the Earth is just another planet.
Earth, of course, can be studied without the aid of spacecraft. Nevertheless it was not until the twentieth century that we had maps of the entire planet. Pictures of the planet taken from space are of considerable importance; for example, they are an enormous help in weather prediction and especially in tracking and predicting hurricanes. And they are extraordinarily beautiful.
The Earth is divided into several layers which have distinct chemical and seismic properties (depths in km):
-0- 40 Crust 40- 400 Upper mantle 400- 650 Transition region 650-2700 Lower mantle 2700-2890 D'' layer 2890-5150 Outer core 5150-6378 Inner core 

 


The crust varies considerably in thickness, it is thinner under the oceans, thicker under the continents. The inner core and crust are solid; the outer core and mantle layers are plastic or semi-fluid. The various layers are separated by discontinuities which are evident in seismic data; the best known of these is the Mohorovicic discontinuity between the crust and upper mantle.


Earth as seen from the Moon

Most of the mass of the Earth is in the mantle, most of the rest in the core; the part we inhabit is a tiny fraction of the whole (values below x10^24 kilograms):

 

 atmosphere = 0.0000051 oceans = 0.0014 crust = 0.026 mantle = 4.043 outer core = 1.835 inner core = 0.09675 

The core is probably composed mostly of iron (or nickel/iron) though it is possible that some lighter elements may be present, too. Temperatures at the center of the core may be as high as 7500 K, hotter than the surface of the Sun. The lower mantle is probably mostly silicon, magnesium and oxygen with some iron, calcium and aluminum. The upper mantle is mostly olivene and pyroxene (iron/magnesium silicates), calcium and aluminum. We know most of this only from seismic techniques; samples from the upper mantle arrive at the surface as lava from volcanoes but the majority of the Earth is inaccessible. The crust is primarily quartz (silicon dioxide) and other silicates like feldspar. Taken as a whole, the Earth’s chemical composition (by mass) is:

 34.6% Iron 29.5% Oxygen 15.2% Silicon 12.7% Magnesium 2.4% Nickel 1.9% Sulfur 0.05% Titanium

 

The Earth is the densest major body in the solar system.

 

The other terrestrial planets probably have similar structures and compositions with some differences: the Moon has at most a small core; Mercury has an extra large core (relative to its diameter); the mantles of Mars and the Moon are much thicker; the Moon and Mercury may not have chemically distinct crusts; Earth may be the only one with distinct inner and outer cores. Note, however, that our knowledge of planetary interiors is mostly theoretical even for the Earth.


Earth as a map of the world

Unlike the other terrestrial planets, Earth’s crust is divided into several separate solid plates which float around independently on top of the hot mantle below. The theory that describes this is known as plate tectonics. It is characterized by two major processes: spreading and subduction. Spreading occurs when two plates move away from each other and new crust is created by upwelling magma from below. Subduction occurs when two plates collide and the edge of one dives beneath the other and ends up being destroyed in the mantle. There is also transverse motion at some plate boundaries (i.e. the San Andreas Fault in California) and collisions between continental plates (i.e. India/Eurasia). There are (at present) eight major plates:

  • North American Plate – North America, western North Atlantic and Greenland 
  • South American Plate – South America and western South Atlantic
  • Antarctic Plate – Antarctica and the “Southern Ocean”
  • Eurasian Plate – eastern North Atlantic, Europe and Asia except for India
  • African Plate – Africa, eastern South Atlantic and western Indian Ocean
  • Indian-Australian Plate – India, Australia, New Zealand and most of Indian Ocean
  • Nazca Plate – eastern Pacific Ocean adjacent to South America
  • Pacific Plate – most of the Pacific Ocean (and the southern coast of California!)

There are also twenty or more small plates such as the Arabian, Cocos, and Philippine Plates. Earthquakes are much more common at the plate boundaries. Plotting their locations makes it easy to see the plate boundaries (right).

The Earth’s surface is very young. In the relatively short (by astronomical standards) period of 500,000,000 years or so erosion and tectonic processes destroy and recreate most of the Earth’s surface and thereby eliminate almost all traces of earlier geologic surface history (such as impact craters). Thus the very early history of the Earth has mostly been erased. The Earth is 4.5 to 4.6 billion years old, but the oldest known rocks are about 4 billion years old and rocks older than 3 billion years are rare. The oldest fossils of living organisms are less than 3.9 billion years old. There is no record of the critical period when life was first getting started.

 71 Percent of the Earth’s surface is covered with water. Earth is the only planet on which water can exist in liquid form on the surface (though there may be liquid ethane or methane on Titan’s surface and liquid water beneath the surface of Europa). Liquid water is, of course, essential for life as we know it. The heat capacity of the oceans is also very important in keeping the Earth’s temperature relatively stable. Liquid water is also responsible for most of the erosion and weathering of the Earth’s continents, a process unique in the solar system today (though it may have occurred on Mars in the past).

And when the earth starts moving, it is time to get out of the way…

Click any of the images to see the video… Brace yourself!

When The Earth Starts Moving…

THE EARTH

Earth is the third planet from the Sun and the fifth largest:

 orbit: 149,600,000 km (1.00 AU) from Sun diameter: 12,756.3 km mass: 5.972e24 kg
The Earth as seen from space

Earth is the only planet whose English name does not derive from Greek/Roman mythology. The name derives from Old English and Germanic. There are, of course, hundreds of other names for the planet in other languages. In Roman Mythology, the goddess of the Earth was Tellus – the fertile soil (Greek: Gaia, terra mater – Mother Earth).

It was not until the time of Copernicus (the sixteenth century) that it was understood that the Earth is just another planet.
Earth, of course, can be studied without the aid of spacecraft. Nevertheless it was not until the twentieth century that we had maps of the entire planet. Pictures of the planet taken from space are of considerable importance; for example, they are an enormous help in weather prediction and especially in tracking and predicting hurricanes. And they are extraordinarily beautiful.
The Earth is divided into several layers which have distinct chemical and seismic properties (depths in km):
-0- 40 Crust 40- 400 Upper mantle 400- 650 Transition region 650-2700 Lower mantle 2700-2890 D'' layer 2890-5150 Outer core 5150-6378 Inner core 

 


The crust varies considerably in thickness, it is thinner under the oceans, thicker under the continents. The inner core and crust are solid; the outer core and mantle layers are plastic or semi-fluid. The various layers are separated by discontinuities which are evident in seismic data; the best known of these is the Mohorovicic discontinuity between the crust and upper mantle.


Earth as seen from the Moon

Most of the mass of the Earth is in the mantle, most of the rest in the core; the part we inhabit is a tiny fraction of the whole (values below x10^24 kilograms):

 

 atmosphere = 0.0000051 oceans = 0.0014 crust = 0.026 mantle = 4.043 outer core = 1.835 inner core = 0.09675 

The core is probably composed mostly of iron (or nickel/iron) though it is possible that some lighter elements may be present, too. Temperatures at the center of the core may be as high as 7500 K, hotter than the surface of the Sun. The lower mantle is probably mostly silicon, magnesium and oxygen with some iron, calcium and aluminum. The upper mantle is mostly olivene and pyroxene (iron/magnesium silicates), calcium and aluminum. We know most of this only from seismic techniques; samples from the upper mantle arrive at the surface as lava from volcanoes but the majority of the Earth is inaccessible. The crust is primarily quartz (silicon dioxide) and other silicates like feldspar. Taken as a whole, the Earth’s chemical composition (by mass) is:

 34.6% Iron 29.5% Oxygen 15.2% Silicon 12.7% Magnesium 2.4% Nickel 1.9% Sulfur 0.05% Titanium

 

The Earth is the densest major body in the solar system.

 

The other terrestrial planets probably have similar structures and compositions with some differences: the Moon has at most a small core; Mercury has an extra large core (relative to its diameter); the mantles of Mars and the Moon are much thicker; the Moon and Mercury may not have chemically distinct crusts; Earth may be the only one with distinct inner and outer cores. Note, however, that our knowledge of planetary interiors is mostly theoretical even for the Earth.


Earth as a map of the world

Unlike the other terrestrial planets, Earth’s crust is divided into several separate solid plates which float around independently on top of the hot mantle below. The theory that describes this is known as plate tectonics. It is characterized by two major processes: spreading and subduction. Spreading occurs when two plates move away from each other and new crust is created by upwelling magma from below. Subduction occurs when two plates collide and the edge of one dives beneath the other and ends up being destroyed in the mantle. There is also transverse motion at some plate boundaries (i.e. the San Andreas Fault in California) and collisions between continental plates (i.e. India/Eurasia). There are (at present) eight major plates:

  • North American Plate – North America, western North Atlantic and Greenland 
  • South American Plate – South America and western South Atlantic
  • Antarctic Plate – Antarctica and the “Southern Ocean”
  • Eurasian Plate – eastern North Atlantic, Europe and Asia except for India
  • African Plate – Africa, eastern South Atlantic and western Indian Ocean
  • Indian-Australian Plate – India, Australia, New Zealand and most of Indian Ocean
  • Nazca Plate – eastern Pacific Ocean adjacent to South America
  • Pacific Plate – most of the Pacific Ocean (and the southern coast of California!)

There are also twenty or more small plates such as the Arabian, Cocos, and Philippine Plates. Earthquakes are much more common at the plate boundaries. Plotting their locations makes it easy to see the plate boundaries (right).

The Earth’s surface is very young. In the relatively short (by astronomical standards) period of 500,000,000 years or so erosion and tectonic processes destroy and recreate most of the Earth’s surface and thereby eliminate almost all traces of earlier geologic surface history (such as impact craters). Thus the very early history of the Earth has mostly been erased. The Earth is 4.5 to 4.6 billion years old, but the oldest known rocks are about 4 billion years old and rocks older than 3 billion years are rare. The oldest fossils of living organisms are less than 3.9 billion years old. There is no record of the critical period when life was first getting started.

 71 Percent of the Earth’s surface is covered with water. Earth is the only planet on which water can exist in liquid form on the surface (though there may be liquid ethane or methane on Titan’s surface and liquid water beneath the surface of Europa). Liquid water is, of course, essential for life as we know it. The heat capacity of the oceans is also very important in keeping the Earth’s temperature relatively stable. Liquid water is also responsible for most of the erosion and weathering of the Earth’s continents, a process unique in the solar system today (though it may have occurred on Mars in the past).

And when the earth starts moving, it is time to get out of the way…

Click any of the images to see the video… Brace yourself!

Jeddah is a nice city where you can meet a lot of nice people too!

A Beautiful Sunset View In Jeddah

In this Private beach, you see a lot of foreigners from different countries, like Canada, France, Norway, Italy, Australia, Japan, Philippines. All are enjoying the privilege to swim freely and have fun.

Private beach in Jeddah where you can freely swim and scuba dive!

I work as an Orthodontist and live in the City of Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia for about almost 4 years now. I would never have thought to coming here at all, to think that I got my Residency Research Fellowship at the USIID in N.Y. 

This photo was taken sometimes November of 1996 at Dr. Weiss' Tower Dental suite 69/F of The Chrysler Building, 405 Lexington Avenue, Manhattan, New York City. My colleague took this shot to capture the sunset with the Empire Tower and me by the window. It was amazing shot! You can spot my dental chair though reflected on my glass window... hahahaha... anyway we can understand that he is a tooth doctor like me and not a professional photographer, right? Right! Thank you 🙂

So everyone usually ask me why not I stayed in the US

Good thing I had this chance to have this pose with The Twin Towers as my background, 1996, five years before the September 11 Attacks.

 instead of coming to Jeddah?

Every time I go in public I must wear my black uniform known as "abaya". I asked my dental nurse to take this shot while posing like I was picking up the Mosque. Then after a few minutes a Saudi lady came to ask us to show her the photo we just took because she got so curious what we were doing. I asked my nurse who is a Muslim, "did we do something bad, is she gonna report us or something?" Then we showed her the shots we took. And she was happy and amazed how we came up with that idea like we're holding the mosque tower. Hahahaha... funny.

Well it was a long story. But for sure it’s all about the package they offered to me so I took the job.
Anyways I get to visit my birth country Philippines

The Hundred Islands, Philippines, Alaminus Pangasinan

and Paris

Eiffel Tower at Night, Paris France

every 6 months and spend my holidays with my love ones.

With my kids

with my French family...

So far I am already adjusted to it at the moment but it won’t be forever though, hehehehe because I look forward to live in France for good.

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A Restaurant Where You Can Only Admitted Bare-footed…

VILLA ESCUDERO RESTAURANT IN THE PHILIPPINES

Would you like to dine in this restaurant?
I would like to experience it, I will check it out on my next holiday…2 months from now.
 Imagine that Philippines is my Birth Country and it’s only now
that I cross over their website, and know about them?  Wow!

 

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